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Steering stud assembly - (Read 298 Times)
 
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DBrown67
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Post Icon Posted: Feb 3rd, 2013 at 11:40 am

I'm beginning to wonder if I have a wrong part fitted to my van. I bought a steering stud/bush assembly with bracket and fitted is as one piece. But I have a problem now where the Milton Zetec steering idler arm has come loose on the end, and the bushing in the assembly is slowly winding itself out of the housing. Smiley

Now I've looked online at parts at this website:
http://www.smallfordspares.co.uk/products/e20-lb-1-steering-idler-stud-assy

That part looks like is screws into the bracket from below. But this looks like a one piece fitting into the bracket with the arm going on top. Mine isn't like this as it's in two parts. One bit screws into the bracket from below, but it then takes a bushing that screws in from above. Then the Milton arm goes on top of that. Is this correct??


EDIT: A picture tells a 1000 words, so let me be clear:



On my car the green bit screws into the red bit. It's this green bit that's winding out slowly as I drive. The red bit was already installed into the bracket and I never touched it, except to pump grease inside.
I greased the green bit and then screwed it fully home, then backed it out one half turn.

I need to tighten the Milton arm back up, but of course when I do that the green bit will screw home fully as I tighten the arm. Then I could undo the red part one half turn. Is this the way?

« Last Edited by DBrown67 Feb 3rd, 2013 at 12:07 pm »
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Dalek
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Post Icon Posted: Feb 3rd, 2013 at 02:35 pm

The green bit can only unwind if its not done up tight enough against the arm, unless the whole thing is vibrating loose and spinning ?

Put some point marks on and see whats moving ?

Craig
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The only fuse in an Anglia is for the indicator circuit
DBrown67
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Post Icon Posted: Feb 3rd, 2013 at 04:34 pm

Feb 3rd, 2013 at 02:35 pm, Dalek wrote:
The green bit can only unwind if its not done up tight enough against the arm


This is the problem. I could use some wire through the hole where the split pin goes and wrap that round the arm. That would stop it spinning if it came loose again. (Like the bits of wire in the gearbox selector rails)

Or wind it back in fully when tightening the top nut, then undo the large bit one half turn from below. But I'm not sure if I'm supposed to undo that bit. It's very difficult to tighten the top nut while keeping the idler at one half turn. It naturally wants to turn as you tighten the top nut.
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Dalek
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Post Icon Posted: Feb 4th, 2013 at 02:35 am

Try another assembly ? Maybe the one you bought is a duffer ?

Craig
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The only fuse in an Anglia is for the indicator circuit
DBrown67
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Post Icon Posted: Feb 8th, 2013 at 07:57 am

OK had a go at this today. Removed the split pin and then screwed the green bit fully tight. It's now tight in the chamfered hole of the Milton steering arm.

Doing this though means it went tight into the red part of the assembly too (or so I thought). So I was convinced that the steering would be a no go in one direction. But on testing it steers fine. I can get lock to lock no problem.

This leads me to think that the Milton steering bar might be slightly thicker than the original Anglia bar. Meaning the green part of the assembly cannot "bottom out" inside the red bit. This would automatically allow the "half turn" of play needed in the original set up.

Maybe someone can confirm the thickness of original Ford arms to Milton Zetec arms?

Needless to say I will be keeping a close eye on it in the future to make sure it doesn't come looses again.
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JAN
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Post Icon Posted: Feb 8th, 2013 at 09:05 am

The two parts are normally sold as an assembly and should be kept together. The parts from different manufacturers vary slighly in their specifications which can cause binding or sloppiness. One of your posts suggests that you have interchanged them so this might be a possible cause.

If they are correctly matched, there is little clearance between the stud's external thread inside the bush's internal thread. In practice, this makes forcing grease down between the two very difficult, and if you've ever tried to grease these joints with a hand grease gun, you'll know how hard it is. If you have greased the bush before inserting the stud, the stud will screw in as far as the grease allows, when it will bottom out with some threads still not in contact with each other; the stud has not fully entered the bush. This will happen earlier if screwing the stud in by hand; once the linkage is assembled the extra leverage available through the steering box will allow the stud further movement. I think this might be what has happened here.

The stud should not though unscrew itself from the bush: it's rotation should be limited to the swing of the idler arm, and no more. The stud has a taper fitting into the tapered hole of the arm, and if these seat properly, the two should be solid with no possibility of the stud turning inside the idler arm. I can only assume that the tapers are mismatched (very unlikely) or that the 9/16" AF nut wasn't quite fully tight. If you tighten the nut, then remove it, you should not be able to remove the arm by hand - a puller or taper breaker (or big hammer!) should be needed. If you can simply pull it off by hand, then your problem's in there somewhere!
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